Cloak of Respectability

I would like to thank all those who wrote comments in response to the following Guardian article, article http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/18/des-Kelly-people-paying-f...  I was heartened that so many people truly understood the issues and also that they acknowledged those vulnerable and priceless human beings who suffered horrendous abuse at Isard House. 

Individuals like Mr Des Kelly who are considered  "The Experts" who influence policy and who are listened to by Government should be beyond reproach. when such an individual is in a position of power and has been implicated in the abuse of vulnerable people then the very least thing that should happen is a though investigation of all the available evidence. That evidence has been made available to Government and the CQC but no such investigation has taken place. (My Book Beyond The Facade details the evidence against Mr Kelly).

We do not have to look far to see what happens when public figures are implicated in abuse and continue to abuse because no one dares question them because of the position they hold, but what is of greatest concern is the system that is there to protect the most vulnerable is the the same system that not only harbored Mr Kelly but allowed him to influence such areas as the current CQC inspection regime.  A Cloak of respectability should not be a hiding place.

My second comment on the Guardian web-site raised these issues. I have seen this pattern in many whistle-blower cases, the whistle-blower is left with no job and the wrong doer thrives. We all need to ask questions of the institutions who held Mr Kelly in such high esteem. I will never forget the torture I witnessed and I know there is only way to stop abuse and that is accountability, Ednas law would give that accountability.